Reports/Studies (Eng)

Technical and analytical studies and reports regarding mining issues and local conditions at the Marlin Mine in San Marcos, Guatemala. (Leer estudios en español)

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

The Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. “Searching for Gold in the Highlands of Guatemala: Economic Benefits and Environmental Risks of the Marlin Mine.” September 2011.

  • Major findings include: 1. The Guatemalan government’s share of Marlin’s high profits is minimal; 2. The environmental risk the Marlin mine poses to local communities is exceptionally high and likely to increase; 3. The Marlin mine is contributing little to sustainable development in Guatemala

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Pastoral Peace and Ecology Commission (COPAE) and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee (UUSC). “Issues of Recuperation and Approximate Costs for the Recuperation of the Marlin Mine.” July 2011.

  • This study approximates the costs which Montana Exploradara, a subsidiary of the Canadian company Goldcorp, would have to assume upon closing the Marlin Mine in San Marcos, in terms of recuperating the environmental damage provoked by the mining operation. Study concludes current bond posted by Goldcorp for $1million drastically inadequate to cover the   $49million estimate that does not include costs to human health or water treatment that may be required indefinitely.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. “Disputed Ground: A Community User’s Guide to the Review Process of the Office of the Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility Counsellor (CANADA).” August 2011.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Goldcorp, Inc. “Goldcorp’s Second Update to the Marlin Mine HRA Report – April 2011.”

  • Goldcorp’s Second Update to address the recommendations issued in its own Human Rights Assessment. “Goldcorp does not intend to publish further reports on the entirety of the original HRA. As noted above, one of the objectives of the HRA was to establish a comprehensive framework to integrate human rights explicitly throughout all Goldcorp management and operational processes. As described in this report, many of the recommendations have been met and are integrated into Goldcorp’s management and operational processes.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Johan Van de Wauw, University of Ghent. “Are Groundwater over-extraction and reduced infiltration contributing to Arsenic related health problems near the Marlin mine (Guatemala)?” October 14, 2010.

  • An analysis of the monitoring data provided by the mining company Montana Exploradora de Guatemala shows that arsenic concentrations are sharply rising in their production well. Arsenic concentrations in some groundwater wells around the nearby Marlin mine fall far above the WHO and North-American and Canadian health standards for drinking water.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

COPAE and Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. “Response to Inter0institutional Commission Analyzing Cracked Houses Around the Marlin Mine I Project.” August 2010.

  • COPAE—UUSC found that the Marlin mine is the most likely cause of the damage; whereas the Comisión concluded the causes were seismic events, poor soils, and poor building practices. Below, we discuss some concerns about the Comisión investigation. We raise these concerns sincerely in the hopes of working with the Comisión in achieving the most judicious engineering conclusions regarding the damaged villages.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

E- Tech International’s “Executive Summary of Environmental and Social Impact Study.” August 2010.

  • An evaluation of the Environmental and Social Impact Study (EIA&S; Estudio de Evaluación de Impacto Ambiental y Social) and the extent to which predictions made about water quality before mining began comport with actual conditions at the mine.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people in Guatemala, James Anaya.” United Nations Human Rights Council. 8 July 2010.

  • Preliminary note on the application of the principle of consultation with indigenous peoples in Guatemala and the case of the Marlin mine

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Guide to Free, Prior and Informed Consent.” Oxfam. June 2010.

  • The guide is designed to assist the organisations supporting communities affected by large-scale development projects. It is a practical tool to facilitate dialogue between communities and the project developers – including companies, government and financiers. The guide contains a practical seven step framework which aims to assist Indigenous Peoples affected by a project to collectively claim their right to FPIC. It also outlines the same principles as they apply to all project-affected communities. It includes a section as a resource to help communities understand their rights, with useful tips and information. The guide also contains some “red flags” describing what can go wrong and difficulties that communities may encounter.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. “Medidas cautelares” 20 mayo 2010.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Human Rights Assessment Of Goldcorp’s Marlin Mine: Executive Summary.” On Common Ground. May 2010.

  • In 2008, a group of socially responsible shareholders called on Goldcorp to undertake an independent human rights impact assessment of the mine. This executive summary is a consolidated version of Human Rights Assessment of Goldcorp’s Marlin Mine. It includes a brief introduction, the complete findings and recommendations of the assessment, and brief conclusions. The full report can be downloaded from http://www.hria-guatemala.com.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Physicians for Human Rights. “Toxic Metals and Indigenous Peoples Near the Marlin Mine in Western Guatemala: Potential Exposures and Impacts on Health,” May 2010.

  • “Environmental health scientists from the University of Michigan find that a sample of Guatemalans who live near a controversial gold and silver mine in the country’s western highlands have higher levels of potentially toxic heavy metals in their urine and blood than a sample of residents who live farther from the mine. Looking at environmental impacts, the scientists also find significant differences in the quality of water samples taken from creeks just downstream from the mine, as compared to a site upstream and a river farther downstream. The scientists warn that metals exposure caused by the mine is likely to increase over time, and could last for decades.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

International Labour Organization. “Report of the Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations.” 2010.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Two Million Tonnes a Day: A Mine Waste Primer.” MiningWatch Canada. Dec 2009.

  • The creation of large volumes of waste, including solids, liquid effluents, and air emissions, is a fact of life for mining and mineral processing operations. Depending on the minerals’ natural geology and how they are processed these wastes can often be hazardous to the environment and human health. Solid wastes including waste rock and tailings are, by volume, the most significant waste generated by mining and mineral processing.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Joris van de Sandt. “Mining Conflicts and Indigenous Peoples in Guatemala” Cordaid Report, September 2009.

  • “Over the past decade there has been a strong upsurge in mining investments by transnational mining companies in Guatemala. The first large mining project, the Marlin gold mine in San Marcos (owned by Goldcorp Inc. of Canada and operated by Montana Exploradora de Guatemala S.A.), has generated much controversy among the Maya indigenous communities affected by it. This study of the conflict surrounding the Marlin mine analyzes the economic, environmental and social impacts of mining and describes how these communities have responded to defend their interests.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

COPAE & Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. “DAMAGED BUILDINGS NEAR THE MARLIN MINE: Preliminary Investigation and Analysis of Building Damage in the Villages of Agel, El Salitre, San José Ixcaniche, and San José Nueva Esperanza, San Miguel Ixtahuacán and Sipacapa Municipalities, San Marcos Department, Guatemala.” November 2009.

  • “…Most significantly, buildings in the villages near the mine have many more cracks than the buildings in the control villages.  Land instability, seismic activity, damage due to underlying soil types, and to faulty construction were eliminated as likely causes of the structural cracking.  The type and pattern of most cracks were determined to be those caused by ground vibrations.  Vibration monitoring results were not conclusive as to the damage being caused by ground vibrations, but no other possible causes were identified.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Second Annual Report on the Monitoring and Analysis of the Water Quality.” COPAE July 2009.

  • The Pastoral Commission for Peace and Ecology of the San Marcos diocese has been monitoring the quality of surface waters since 2007 in order to determine the presence of heavy metals in them. The monitoring is carried out in the Tzala and Quivichil rivers, located around the operation center of the Marlin Mine.

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Investing in Conflict: Public Money, Private Gain. Goldcorp in the Americas.” April 2008.

  • “The nexus of mining companies, the mainstream media, the Canadian government, International Finance Institutions and bought off NGOs work hard to keep the reality of large-scale, open pit mines out of picture, keep community resistance marginalized, and no matter what, to keep talking about “development.” This report is about bringing hard facts and community perspectives together to help North Americans become more informed about the nature of the mining industry.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Jantzi Research Recommends Goldcorp as Ineligle for Socially Responsible Investment Portfolios.” April 2008.

  • “In February 2008, Jantzi Research’s mining analyst participated in a fact-finding mission to Guatemala.The analyst met with various stakeholders of the Marlin mine to further investigate the concerns being raised regarding community, health and environmental impacts of the mine. Jantzi Research now recommends that the company be considered ineligible for SRI portfolios.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Ethical Funds. “Sustainability Perspectives: Winning the Social License to Operate: Resource Extraction with Free, Prior and Informed Community Consent.” February 2008.

  • Ethical Funds’ recommendations on how to implement free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) for resource extraction companies. “Around the world, communities are demonstrating a new assertiveness when it comes to rejecting resource extraction projects. This is particularly true of Indigenous communities. Companies seeking to secure access to resources must first secure their free, prior, and informed consent.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Bank Secrets” December 2007

  • “The aim of this report is to list the well-documented bad practices of 13 companies and to shed light on the banking groups that finance these companies.  It would appear that as many as 121 banking groups are involved in the financing of these enterprises. And all of this takes place in spite of statements about socially responsible investments and corporate social responsibility as trumpeted by the banking groups.  Public smooth talking covers up the real types of investment which take place, precious banking secrets which the banks do their utmost to hide from public view.  This report will shed light on areas the banks would prefer to keep in darkness.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

“Metal Mining and Human Rights in Guatemala: The Marlin Mine in San Marcos.” September 2006.

  • “…We tried to explain the general aspects of the mining industry to provide an understanding how mining companies set up and operate in Guatemala, and the consequences. We decided to use the Marlin mine as an example because we have been maintaining a presence in that area with international accompaniment and observation. We think this case illustrates the problem very well and it has been at the center of national debate since Glamis Gold Ltd. arrived in Guatemala.”

*    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

Compliance Advisor Ombudsman. “ASSESSMENT of a complaint submitted to CAO in relation to the Marlin Mining Project in Guatemala.” Sept 2005.

  • “The Office of Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO) is the independent recourse mechanism for the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA). In March 2005 the CAO received a complaint from communities in Sipacapa municipality local to the Marlin mining project in Guatemala. The complaint raises concerns that the project will: (a) reduce access by the community to local water supplies; and (b) result in contamination of local waterways. In addition, the complaint alleges that the project was developed without adequate consultation and in violation of the rights of indigenous people and that the mine exacerbates social tensions, violence and insecurity.”
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: